PDA

View Full Version : Guild Seekers - What do you look for?


Heresford
09-25-2008, 02:17 PM
<p>We're trying to settle a disagreement in my guild over keeping players with inactive accounts.</p><p>Here's the scenario:</p><p>Argument A: People have life issues (military deployments, financial hardships, etc.) that make them leave for months at a time. They are grateful when they come back and find that their characters are still in the guild, along with all their guild status.</p><p>Argument B: People look up guild statistics when they consider joining a guild. If the average guild member level is too low, or if the guild membership is large and they are looking for a medium-sized guild, then they won't join that guild. They'll never know that the active membership of that guild is indeed medium-sized, which was what they were looking for.</p><p>So my question is: What do you look for, or what did you look for, when deciding on a guild to join? Did you go on to Station Players and start looking up guild stats? If so, which statistics were important to you? Was your decision based mostly on researching the guild or on your experiences with existing guild members?</p><p>Any and all thoughts and opinions are welcome.</p>

Spyderbite
09-25-2008, 02:29 PM
Our policy is: If somebody is inactive for more than 30 days without giving notice to the Officers, they are demoted. 60-90 days inactive without prior notice to the Officers and they're unguilded. They're welcome to re-join.. but they start at the bottom of the ranks. Basically its just a matter of showing respect and giving advance notice before going MIA.I got lucky when I started playing EQ2 and just happened to bump in to somebody in EFP who I grouped with for an afternoon and had a great time. I noticed their guild tag and inquired about the guild. They referred me to the guild leader, we hit it off and I've been in the same guild ever since. With more than 200 members on a very low population server, we must be doing something right. <img src="/smilies/3b63d1616c5dfcf29f8a7a031aaa7cad.gif" border="0" alt="SMILEY" />

valkry
09-25-2008, 02:33 PM
<p>1) If it says "Raid" on the recruiting page, or guild web site (if listed)... I'm gone. Call it philosphical differences, but if that is your priority, I'm a bad fit for your guild.</p><p>2) Other then that I'm looking at the big picture... what do they list on their recruitment info. My husband & I joined our current guild because they specific said "Military friendly" in the notes. That means to me that they WILL NOT ditch a character who's player might be off risking his/her life, because they missed a raid (or 60) while unable to find a computer. We are both ex- now, but have sympathy for those still in.</p><p>I'd rather have semi-adult conversation in guild chat: not WoW-wannabes cussing up a storm, but I don't want to feel bad, if I make an off-colored joke.</p><p>Finally, I'd rather not have folks who have long tirades (about anything, in game or RL) in voice chat, esp puncutated w/ the cuss words. I'd like to be able to listen to the chat on speakers w/o having my kids learn new words.</p>

Dareena
09-25-2008, 05:29 PM
<p>We're a small faimily style guild with around 100 characters.  But previously, there had been a lot of dead wood characters piling up over the years.  When the stewardship of the guild was turned over to a ruling council, we made a group decision to remove all characters who were inactive for 200+ days.  If they start playing again and wish to rejoin the guild, then they're more than welcome.</p><p>In the big scheme of things, I find that the 200 day limit is more than fair.  Unless someone is on active armed forces service, there's no real reason for them to not use a character (unless they've left the game).  Should someone make special arrangements with the guild, then extended leaves would be fine.  But otherwise, we've got to draw the line somewhere.</p><p>We don't even advertise at all.  While I could make a big advertising campaign to bring in new membership, we seem to be happy with the small town feeling that we've got going on right now.</p><p>In the end, I don't think that most people have put enough thought into joining a guild.  When I joined, I played 20 questions with the founder to make sure that it was exactly what I was looking for.  Now that I'm helping to run the guild, I've realized what questions I was still missing.  But most people just want to join in a guild because of it's level (for their own benefit) and with the expectation for guaranteed guild grouping.</p><p>On your recruitment tab, just make sure that you list the important stuff like....</p><p>1) Command Structure - Who runs the guild?  How are decisions made?  </p><p>2) Guild's Player Base - What kind of player do you cater to?  Crafters?  Soloers?  Groupers?  Raiders?  End game versions of those already mentioned?</p><p>3) Play Time - When do most of you play?  How many active players will you have on average during weekday and weekend prime time hours?</p><p>4) Resources - Do you share your crafter resources to the guild?  What sort of expectations are there for this system?  Or do you share money or items instead?</p><p>5) Guild Chat - What is guild chat used for?  RPing?  Jokes?  Talking about RL?  Encouragement and congratulations?</p><p>6) Guild Expectations - What do you want out of your members?  This needs to be covered up front.</p><p>7) Raiding - Do you raid as a guild?  If you're not a true raid guild, then are you part of a raid alliance?  Or is it every member for themselves?</p><p>8) Guild Activities - Do you sponsor questing groups?  Or raids?  Perhaps crafting writ grinding sessions for leveling the guild?  Maybe some other guild sponsored activity?</p><p>9) Atmosphere - What is the general tone of your guild?  Describe the general attitude of your player base so that people know if it's the right fit for them.</p><p>10) Experience - Will you take lower level characters?  Or how about new players and being willing to answer their questions?  Or do you have a minimum standard for joining the guild?</p><p>(That's all I think of off the top of my head.)</p>

Heresford
09-25-2008, 06:21 PM
<p>Thanks for the recruiting advice. That will be helpful. I'm still primarily interested in the question from the point of view of someone looking for a guild as opposed to a leader marketing a guild or officers setting policy about membership. I have my own opinions about guild policy, but I'm curious about how a player goes about choosing a guild -- from the player's point of view.</p><p>So, just to reiterate:</p><p>What do you look for, or what did you look for, when deciding on a guild to join? Did you go on to Station Players and start looking up guild stats? If so, which statistics were important to you? Was your decision based mostly on researching the guild or on your experiences with existing guild members?</p><p>Also, did you even look the guild up on Station Players, or just look at the in-game recruiting information?</p>

Vumael
09-25-2008, 06:48 PM
If you're a serious guild, raid guild etc. inactivity for 10 days or more without notification should basically merit a boot~

Killerbee3000
09-25-2008, 06:50 PM
<p>back then when I joined the first guild I was ever in it just happened, yup thats pretty much it<img src="/eq2/images/smilies/69934afc394145350659cd7add244ca9.gif" border="0" alt="SMILEY" width="15" height="15" /> was having a good time grouping in antonica (grouping in ant? I must be getting old xD) and then at some point the discussion in the group channel turned to guilds, at the end i was in a guild without actually having a clear idea. It did turn out good, until later on I decided I want to raid, however back then I coudnt have picked a guild based on raids or not, as noone in the game was even high enough in lvl.</p><p>Anyway, If I would look for one now I'd go by the following criteria:</p><p>What does the guild do? group? craft? raid?</p><p>since I dont need a guild for the first two, I'd be looking for a raiding guild, since raiding guilds require a high attendace, matching playtimes are important.</p><p>also check if they go after contested or not, having to give 3 weeks notice to get time off at work makes that impossible for me and would kill attendance, so no dice if they do.</p><p>since raiders follow a strict min max philosophy checking if they actually require the class I play would be one of the most important things.</p><p>does the guiold have a track record of being able to kill sutff? sorry, not interest if they are stuck for monthes on easy mobs.</p><p>thats about it what I would be looking for.</p>

Jovie
09-25-2008, 07:26 PM
<p>When i was unguilded, my biggest critical point was finding one without political garbage. (not real life politics, but in game politics)</p><p>I've been in guilds where people actually have power structures and really honestly thought that they were something special because of some officer or leader tag. It baffled me to the point where i just would not participate in such a guild.</p><p>Since then i've pretty much ran my own guild. Drama free, politics free, whining free.</p><p>People can guild with me to share the experiance of the game, have a place to call home and play at THEIR style to gain the most enjoyment for them.</p><p>My current guild in eq2 is tiny, but i never ever advertise and only take inquiries from people who seem genuinly interested.</p><p>As for people who go inactive, i only remove those who i know are not coming back to the game. As for status, only their contributed status goes away if they unguild. Since my guild doesn't revolve around how much status you have, this is a non issue should someone come back.</p><p>Anyway, remember that work is work and eq2 should be play. Don't let a guild become a job for you. Play the way YOU want to play, do not ever let someone dictate your playstyle for you.</p>

Meridia
09-25-2008, 07:37 PM
i wasnt looking for a guild at all when i joined this one, i kinda bumped into the guild leader in 1-9 arguing about lower teir raids.i never look for a guild.  i find them by grouping with people i deem 'non suck' and if they're taking new people i'll consider joining.

pandemonium73
09-25-2008, 09:18 PM
<p >I think I'm typical of one very specific type of player-- the ex-pack player.  I played on launch for about 6 months but left because they hadn't finished making their minds up about what kind of game it was going to be.  I have come back for a few months a year following each expansion. So on average I play about four months a year. During those four months my play style goes thus...rabid, to frequent, to regular, to casual, to infrequent, to cancellation. Except on the rare occasion I find a guild I can raid in (that kept me in for almost a year -post EoF), I'm pretty much like clockwork.  I think there are many like me, who play in the fall/winter and then cancel for spring/summer. Anyhoo, except for a couple of times I remained unguilded, I've joined a different guild each time I've come back to play (sometimes I join the guild that my friends from the last time I played happen to be in, sometimes I strike out on my own), so that makes me pretty good at guild shopping-- I've made a fair share of mistakes I've learned from, but on the flip side, have had more than one success in finding fun groups of people to hang out with.  Here is what I've learned to look for. <span style="color: #ffff00;"> 1. Is the guild large enough</span>.  Because I'm probably going to be out in several months, I try to look for medium to largish guilds where my leaving isn't going to cripple them if they've gotten used to having me.  Because I guild up to find a niche of fun and skilled folks to group with, I look for a guild that has enough players to have multiple groups going, with plenty of room for those who prefer to solo to do their own thing without feeling guilty about it (cuz sometimes that's me!!).  A larger guild also gives me small chance of occasionally raiding, though when I was here last, it was very hard for casual guilds to do much in RoK raiding. I also look for a guild that has camaraderie without being overly friendly, and I've found this more easily in medium to large guilds.  I play the game to relax, not to make new IRL friends. I don't think there is anything wrong with the close knit extended families that folks create in game, but I'm just here for a good time-- I have plenty of IRL friends too, so I need a guild that doesn't NEED me every (insert day/s).  Now during the time I'm playing I'll be a very good in game buddy.  I will show up if I promised to show up, I will spend a good amount of my time helping folks get things done, I will share my shinies with you and will turn over my masters if them's the rules and I will do my fair share of writs.  In exchange, I will rarely ask for anything, except for a spot in this or that group if ya have room for a Warden.  I will even divulge personal info about who I am irl, if we've had a good time together killing stuff, and if you're one for chatting and sharing, but I'll never ask first.  But don't get attached, because I almost never give out my email, and I'll never call or do a meet up, I just don't have the time for that.  And I'll be gone in a few months--if you're around for the next expansion, maybe I'll see ya then if ya keep me on your list or happen to run into me again. <span style="color: #ffff00;">2. How does the guild interact? </span>This is highly personal, and the right "fit" will be different for everybody.  But personally, I look for a group of people that allow cussing and off color humor (within reason- negotiation can be had) in groups without children (I don't mind behaving in general chat and on occasion if a kid is in group, but I don't want to group with kids more than a third of the time), so guilds that are family oriented instead of family friendly aren't as good a fit for me.  On the flip side, I've ended up in a fledgling raid guild full of Bros and Dudes and hearing them flap their e-peens at each other over parses, and cuss each other out over every mistake (Me, I'm always perfect *smirk*), really began to grate on my nerves.  I like a guild that uses voice for raids and some groups, but doesn't require it the rest of the time, or for mundane grinding, I prefer my music!!  I don't need to have something in common with most of the guild, but I like to have something in common with the folks I group with the most (at least the ones I "camp" with), otherwise, what the hell to chat about during the down times? But I don't like groups that are so chatty cathy that it takes forever to get thru a zone.  <span style="color: #ffff00;">3. How is the guild organized? </span> I've been in dictatorships and I've been in democracies and I've been in ones that are a combination of the two.  I by far prefer the ones that have found a good balance between the two.  Total democracies (remember these are M-L guilds I'm talking about) tend to be way too chaotic.  There's a whole lot of brouhaha over every policy but it's hard to get much done when/if changes need to be made. Or, there just is no organization whatever-- it ends up being a big group of people soloing, using the guild channel as their own chat channel and doing solo writs, but never getting together more than that.  Total dictatorships tend to be a bunch of people working for the good of a relatively small hierarchy of people--usually the 24-30 raiders. Not that I mind supporting a guild's raiders, I usually aim to be a reliable raiding sub when I can, but when I've seen a punitive trickle up policy, where the raiders gobble up lots more in dues and masters from the rest of the guild, than they ever manage to hand down, it's usually a dictatorship (once I've run into something that seemed almost like a cult of personality).  The guilds that seem to be the most bustling (steadily leveling up, if not maxed already, holding events, keeping an active website, etc.) seem to have a firm hierarchy for keeping things organized and productive, but a fair and democratic means of settling disputes and addressing policy disputes/changes.  While there is more than one way to do this, if it's going to happen, you will usually find it in a detailed and well thought out guild policy laid out somewhere on their website, and this is the first thing I look for. If a guild does have a good structure and policies I agree with, then I look at the recruitment process....... <span style="color: #ffff00;"> 4.  How does the guild recruit?</span> I have learned to be very suspicious of large guilds that let their officers add people willy nilly without some kind of screening policy.  I want to have a chance to get to know a guild and check it out, without strings attached.  I also want a guild that at least has some method of grouping/raiding with new members to get to know them, because I've found that when a guild doesn't, they can get all manner of bad behavior.  I don't want to wear the tag of a guild full of jerks.  Also, since you CAN'T tell what a guild is like by looking at their recruitment tags, or by grouping with only 5 members, or by looking at stats on Sony Station, a trial period of recruitment, where members have access to the guilds boards and chat, without either party having to commit, is essential. I like to check out to see what guild chat looks like, (stats mean nothing, it's all about who you seen online active and doing stuff, during YOUR game play times-- the biggest and bestest guild in the world isn't a good fit if 90% of the players are only on while you are at work or asleep).  I also like to see the guild forums, how active they are and what is discussed, in what manner, and by whom, can reveal a great deal-- How political is this guild, who are the movers and shakers, do I have anything in common with these people?  Finally, I try to group and duo with as many people as I can. Only after having at least a couple weeks to check everything out, do I even consider joining long term.  As to what gets me to look at a guild's website to begin the process? Well If I'm looking for a guild and I have a really enjoyable pug with them a time or two, I'll go check them out.  If I see a particular tag a lot during my play times and the members pretty much seem like a good lot and have a good rep, I'll check them out.  I might also check out the stats and find all the large guilds and then narrow down from there till I only have 2 or 3 to check out in depth.  I don't think there are any magic key words to put in a guild recruitment effort that will appeal to everyone.  Mentioning raiding will attract some and repel other, as will trumpeting your family friendliness, variable size, role-play status, etc. Just be honest about who you are, because people will find out anyway.  I don't think you should keep non-active people on the rolls (unless they ask) because I'd frankly find it quite awkward to come back online to an old guild, find the folks I liked best gone, or some policy changed, and then have to quit.  If I still have any ties to the guild through my friends list, I'll be back.  I usually try to quit when I leave, but I'm not always able to get back on for that one last log in, so I for one am glad that most guilds drop you after a few months. Long post, but I'm deciding whether or not I want to guild up this time around, so reflecting on the issue is helpful.</p>

M0rticia
09-25-2008, 09:43 PM
I've never looked for a guild using the in-game recruiting tool or looking on forums. What happened with me is I got into a good PUG one day and two of the members were in the same guild. I happened to be unguilded at the time and I really got along well with these 2 players. They mentioned to ME that their guild was recruiting if I ever wanted to join a guild. They didn't pressure me at all. THEN I looked up information about their guild and visited their web site. They were the type of guild I was looking for. They are laid back, fun, helpful, had a large amount of members at all levels and they raid three times a week. Raid requirements weren't super strict. If you couldn't attend a raid for whatever reason, they weren't going to look down on you. They understand that RL things happen and not everyone can be at EVERY raid.Based on the members I met and the guild's play style, I decided that they were a great match for me so I applied. It's a decision I'm glad I made because I really love my guild! <img src="/smilies/3b63d1616c5dfcf29f8a7a031aaa7cad.gif" border="0" alt="SMILEY" />

Noaani
09-26-2008, 01:11 AM
<cite>valkry wrote:</cite><blockquote>1) If it says "Raid" on the recruiting page, or guild web site (if listed)... I'm gone. Call it philosphical differences, but if that is your priority, I'm a bad fit for your guild.</blockquote><p>if its personaly preferance to not raid on your part thats fine, your choice, but just because a guild raids, that doesn't give anyone the right to label them with anything other than they are a guild and they raid.</p><p>There are many guilds out there that advertise the fact that they raid ofte, and sometimes quite successfully, but a lot of these guilds do not have raid participation as a requirement for guild membership. The guild I am in currently is one of them.</p><p>We raid, we have killed every single instanced mob in the game, yet we do not have raiding as a requirement of any of our members. We have about 20 guild members that are in the guild for reasons other than raiding, but are welcome to come along if we have space and they want to. The only point at which the guild I am currently in has any requirements towards raiding is with senior members, whom are required to be on raids if requiested (well, its obviously not really a request). However, there is no tangible benefit in this guild when going from member to senior member.</p><p>As to your other point, I agree that guilds need to accept the fact that people will take leave from the game at times.</p><p>A guild I was in at the start of DoF had this issue. We were a very small hardcore raiding guild (26 members at the time), and one of our members was sent to Iraq. She told us she would be gone for 6 - 9 months, and we said that was fine, she would still be in the guild when she got back, and would still have a spot in the raid if she wanted it. She was gone for more than 18 months, didn't come back until mid EoF. She was still in the guild, and even though we had what we considered a full roster without her, she still started raiding again with us a few days after coming back.</p><p>We never advertised that we are "military friendly", but you will find that the vast majority of people, reguardless of what guild they are in, will bend and/or break their self imposed rules if it is for a good reason. If this person had have not told us she was off, she would have been deguilded in about a week, and come back probably thinking we were unsympathetic towards those in the military, even though we would have had no idea.</p>

therodge
09-26-2008, 01:22 AM
<cite>Noaani wrote:</cite><blockquote><cite>valkry wrote:</cite><blockquote>1) If it says "Raid" on the recruiting page, or guild web site (if listed)... I'm gone. Call it philosphical differences, but if that is your priority, I'm a bad fit for your guild.</blockquote><p>if <u><i><b>its personaly preferance to not raid on your part thats fine, your choice, but just because a guild raids, that doesn't give anyone the right to label them with anything other than they are a guild and they raid.</b></i></u></p><p>There are many guilds out there that advertise the fact that they raid ofte, and sometimes quite successfully, but a lot of these guilds do not have raid participation as a requirement for guild membership. The guild I am in currently is one of them.</p><p>We raid, we have killed every single instanced mob in the game, yet we do not have raiding as a requirement of any of our members. We have about 20 guild members that are in the guild for reasons other than raiding, but are welcome to come along if we have space and they want to. The only point at which the guild I am currently in has any requirements towards raiding is with senior members, whom are required to be on raids if requiested (well, its obviously not really a request). However, there is no tangible benefit in this guild when going from member to senior member.</p><p>As to your other point, I agree that guilds need to accept the fact that people will take leave from the game at times.</p><p>A guild I was in at the start of DoF had this issue. We were a very small hardcore raiding guild (26 members at the time), and one of our members was sent to Iraq. She told us she would be gone for 6 - 9 months, and we said that was fine, she would still be in the guild when she got back, and would still have a spot in the raid if she wanted it. She was gone for more than 18 months, didn't come back until mid EoF. She was still in the guild, and even though we had what we considered a full roster without her, she still started raiding again with us a few days after coming back.</p><p>We never advertised that we are "military friendly", but you will find that the vast majority of people, reguardless of what guild they are in, will bend and/or break their self imposed rules if it is for a good reason. If this person had have not told us she was off, she would have been deguilded in about a week, and come back probably thinking we were unsympathetic towards those in the military, even though we would have had no idea.</p></blockquote>to be 100% fair its a genral rule of thumb their are exceptions to the rule but its still a rule if someone raids 5-7 times a week genrally speaking they are elitist and start to look down at people with less gear or cant play as well, proof, look at eq2 flames, theirs your raiding community comes with the territory, i have seen good people start raiding and become a elitist, its the way it works

Spyderbite
09-26-2008, 03:02 AM
<cite>therodge wrote:</cite><blockquote><cite></cite>to be 100% fair its a genral rule of thumb their are exceptions to the rule but its still a rule if someone raids 5-7 times a week genrally speaking they are elitist and start to look down at people with less gear or cant play as well, proof, look at eq2 flames, theirs your raiding community comes with the territory, i have seen good people start raiding and become a elitist, its the way it works</blockquote>This is true of any guild. There are players who have only played EQ2 or any MMO for that matter for the purpose of End Game raiding. They form a guild with that goal in mind. And, when they see people online in the tradeskill instances working writs and not showing up for a raid, they kick them from the guild. Or, they ask up front if a potential new member is willing to invest the time in raiding as a first priority.Unfortunately, there are guilds as I've described looking to fill raid spots and quantity and/or necessity takes priority. These guilds need to post their motives instead of just corraling in recruits in hopes of filling raid spots.I was lucky enough to join a guild that supports all play styles.. RP, PvP, Tradeskillers, Raiders, etc. And, as a result, have always felt valued from the time I was a "grunt" to the point I was made an "Officer".Bottom line.. critera should be not be veiled. If you're a hard core raid guild.. make that clear. Don't haze people like a Fraternity. If you really accomodate the "military friendly" people.. then do so. If you're interviewing them properly before tossing out an /guild invite then it shouldn't be an issue when they tell you they've been deployed, are going on maternity leave, or going back in for chemo-therapy. And, definitely not a reason to kick them and all the hard work they've contributed to the guild, just because of RL reasons. Especially, if you knew about it before hand. And, the same responsibility applies to the guild members who join. Don't accept that invite if you can't own up to the guild's expectations. Ask questions during your interview. If you're not being interviewed for guild membership and just being tossed a guild tag.. I'd think twice about accepting it.

Ranger13
09-26-2008, 04:42 AM
<p>Without a doubt the leadership.</p><p> There is nothing worse than a gaggle of fools being led by an even bigger fool.</p><p> Things happen, but the majority of the strong, stable guilds are led by strong, stable people.</p>

Estean1
09-26-2008, 05:55 AM
Speaking from experience, I would be VERY cautious when using the Guild tool. The best recruits for any guild are met in game and are either 1) Friends with a current guildie or 2.) Group with guildies and decide they want to be a part of the team.  Our guild still uses the tool but with a very jaded eye.  Every scoundrel, bank stealing, exp mooching, horrible toon that has ever slipped through the cracks in my guild has almost exclusively come from that tool  Most of the times if someone is desperate to be in a guild there is a very good reason.  Of course, there are exceptions to this. I can think of three guildies we currently have that came through the tool and were legitimate players that have fit in great with our current playerbase.  But these are a rare exception to the rule  Any more if someone tries to join my guild through the guild tool I will make him go through a much longer trial period than if he was recommended to me by someone I trust and know.  But to get back on topic - the question "to prune or not to prune"  I think is best answered on a case by case basis not a bright line rule.  It is good to get a number like '200 days" in an earlier post and go through those names and then prune them case by case. Is this person in the military?  Does this person take breaks and come back?  Did this person join then become inactive quickly?  Eq2players can help you in that decision.  If the person has only one person in your guild and 5 other active toons in another guild and hasn't logged on in 10 months?  Cut the dead wood.  Of course we have the rule in our guild that you must have you main in the guild to be a member, so it likely would have never come to that.  As for the question "do people look at the numbers in your guild and not join because they are misled" question.  I would have to say no.   A vast majority will allready know who you are by reputation.  I would say its a very tiny percentage  that knows nothing about your guild and will go research you on eq2players before they join.  It just doesn't happen that often. 

SystemOn
09-26-2008, 11:14 AM
Deleting people from your guild is the stupidest thing any guild can do and if they do i would never join them. Looks like SOE doesn't list inactive players on eq2players anyway so the excuse of people looking up numbers is BS at best.I went through a similar situation where this came up in our guild and i saw first hand what happens after the fact and the peeps that made the decision to delete people were not even playing anymore. They thought that if people come back they would contact them and all would be happy. IDIOTSI had left the guild not long after that thickheaded decision went into guild policy. A couple months later 2 players (a couple) showed up in my friends and i got talking to them, they were HURT. Yes they came back and all the friends they were looking forward to saying hi to and catch up with and WHAM, they are not welcome anymore. I asked why they didn't try and contact anyone, they felt that they were obviously not important enough, or good friends anymore so why should they and joined another guild? The guild lost two wonderful people that day.Don't forget players are real people who make friends and have feelings.

Dareena
09-26-2008, 12:06 PM
<cite>SystemOn wrote:</cite><blockquote>Deleting people from your guild is the stupidest thing any guild can do and if they do i would never join them. Looks like SOE doesn't list inactive players on eq2players anyway so the excuse of people looking up numbers is BS at best.<i>(Cut)</i>Don't forget players are real people who make friends and have feelings.</blockquote><p>Up to a certain point, I can see where you're coming from.  But after that, your arguement goes against itself.  </p><p>If one of your real life friends stopped interacting with you completely for six months and then showed up one day like nothing had happened, would you still treat them same way?  No, I certainly wouldn't.  Someone has ignored me for months and has hurt my feelings in the process.  Then they start to complain about how unfair it is that our relationship has changed because they now want to include me in their lives again?  On top of that, they're whinning about how I've hurt their feelings?  Hypocrites!</p><p>If you're talking about ruthlessly cutting someone after just a couple of weeks of not playing, then I can understand the hurt feelings of those being cut.  But once you go past a month or two, I feel that your rights of emotional entitlement have been lost.</p>

SystemOn
09-26-2008, 02:58 PM
This is a game and didn't think i would have to explain that RL friends are completely different from game friends. This couple said they would be away for a couple weeks as they were moving, but in real life things don't always work out as planned and they simply didn't have time for "games" and couldn't log on, although they really wanted to it just wasn't in the cards for them. And because they had a life they get booted from the guild. That is seriously screwed up mentality.They were excited to finally have life under control enough to start playing again, and they were really looking forward to meeting up with guild and telling them of their adventures in RL and well, oh ya, you had some real life or real problems so out you go, you're no longer part of this guild. I don't even know where to begin on how deeply screwed up that thinking is.The funniest part is the leaders who implemented the change were not even playing anymore.

Amitee
09-26-2008, 08:52 PM
In answering your question about what a guildless person looks for in choosing a guild.. well, I personally look for a guild that has at least a handful of level 80's (just because that's the part of the game I enjoy the most) and of those people I like to see them in the same zones, which tells me they are close enough within the guild that they get groups within the guild instead of going outside the guild.  Nothing speaks worse to me about a guild than seeing a ton of people in a guild and none of them are in the same zone together. 

Calthine
09-26-2008, 09:00 PM
<cite>[email protected] wrote:</cite><blockquote>Our policy is: If somebody is inactive for more than 30 days without giving notice to the Officers, they are demoted. 60-90 days inactive without prior notice to the Officers and they're unguilded. They're welcome to re-join.. but they start at the bottom of the ranks. Basically its just a matter of showing respect and giving advance notice before going MIA.</blockquote>We're a very casual guild, but our guidelines are the same.  Some folks may have a laundry list when they look for a guild, but my criteria can be summed in two words:  No Drama.

Ama
09-26-2008, 11:22 PM
<p>Right now the guild i'm in has a policy where we don't demote, boot, or kick those that are inactive because of military service in whatever country they maybe in.  There are actually 3 people I believe that are currently in my guild that are in active service that I guess are on leave. One of those people has returned from active duty. </p><p>If we do not hear from someone for a period of time about 180-200+ days then we start to question if they are comming back.  Once we pass the 360day mark then we debate upon that person's impact upon the guild.  After discussings the person's impact on the guild we either remove them from the guild or keep them in.  Generally we will keep them in the guild allowing them to return. </p>

Tommara
09-27-2008, 06:34 AM
<p>What do I look for in a guild?  Compatibility.  Obviously.  The biggest persuasive factor is playing with them in game, which might lead me to investigate them further.  But it's more important that they check me out, and learn enough about me that they are ok with me being in their guild.  Because if they don't do that with me, they won't do that with anyone, and will <u>cause</u> drama within the guild once they find a new recruit isn't behaving as required.  </p><p>With respect to guild pruning of inactive members, umm, why do it?  This happened to my husband and me in WoW, and although we were assured that we'd be welcomed back, there wasn't a chance we'd join them again because there was nothing they gained by dropping us.  Having a neat and tidy roster is of no value, but the fact that some thought so was sufficient cause to stay away - the guild was no longer the easy-going friendly group that we had joined.  And they lost my son, an active member and officer, as well.  </p><p>With respect to EQ2, my husband and I are officers in a guild originally composed of friends and friends of friends from the original EQ.  We are the only two left.  I've been thinking of taking one of my low level toons out of the guild into another guild. But dropping anyone from our guild?  The thought has never occurred to me, and although now it has, it won't happen.  Ever.</p>

pandemonium73
09-27-2008, 01:52 PM
<cite>[email protected] DLere wrote:</cite><blockquote><cite>SystemOn wrote:</cite><blockquote>Deleting people from your guild is the stupidest thing any guild can do and if they do i would never join them. Looks like SOE doesn't list inactive players on eq2players anyway so the excuse of people looking up numbers is BS at best.<i>(Cut)</i>Don't forget players are real people who make friends and have feelings.</blockquote><p>Up to a certain point, I can see where you're coming from.  But after that, your arguement goes against itself.  </p><p>If one of your real life friends stopped interacting with you completely for six months and then showed up one day like nothing had happened, would you still treat them same way?  No, I certainly wouldn't.  Someone has ignored me for months and has hurt my feelings in the process.  Then they start to complain about how unfair it is that our relationship has changed because they now want to include me in their lives again?  On top of that, they're whinning about how I've hurt their feelings?  Hypocrites!</p><p>If you're talking about ruthlessly cutting someone after just a couple of weeks of not playing, then I can understand the hurt feelings of those being cut.  But once you go past a month or two, I feel that your rights of emotional entitlement have been lost.</p></blockquote>I'm just playing devil's advocate here, because I think dropping people from guild rolls is no big deal personally.  But I wanted to point out that there are plenty of people who feel very differently about friendships.  I am 35 years old and have so many names in my address book that if I DIDN'T have friends with very active lives who disappear to do their own thing for months at a time and then show up later, I'd never have time to fit them all in regularly.  Even among my closest friends, it is not unusual to have folks shift in and out of close contact as their lives dictate.My view of friendship is that it doesn't just end when that person gets too busy to worry solely about my needs.  I love my friends and want them to be happy, so when one meets a perfect mate and dissapears for 6 months during the bonding and honeymood phase, I'm not resentful, I'm HAPPY for them.  They will be welcome back whenever they are ready to come around more.  Same goes for any other reason a friend might become too busy to see me.  If they come back, it means they still care, so why would one turn them away?